Personal cleanliness was found to be inversely related to bacterial compounds on floors and mattresses, but home cleanliness did not reduce microbial markers (only dust amount). Muramic acid exposure was associated with a lower rate of school-age asthma, and mattress endotoxin in the first year of life was inversely linked to atopic sensitization and asthma at school age. However, the development of allergies was not related to home and personal cleanliness despite the associations of dust with cleanliness and allergic health conditions. Bacterial exposure in house dust was a factor in the development of childhood allergic disorders and asthma, but neither personal nor home cleanliness was associated with an increased risk for these disorders.

The authors state that microbial components in house dust that are not affected by personal hygiene may play a role in the risk of allergic disorders and asthma in children. Future studies are needed with larger microbial exposure analyses of distinct species.

For more information visit ATSJournal.org.


Continue Reading