The 2013 list also included:

  • Don’t prescribe oral antifungal therapy for suspected nail fungus without confirmation of a fungal infection. Approximately half of all patients with suspected nail fungus do not have a fungal infection.
  • Don’t perform sentinel lymph node biopsy or other diagnostic tests for the evaluation of early, thin melanoma because they do not improve survival. The five-year survival rate for patients with these types of melanoma is 97%, and there is a low risk of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body.
  • Don’t treat uncomplicated, nonmelanoma skin cancer < 1cm in size on the trunk and extremities with Mohs micrographic surgery. In patients with skin cancer on certain parts of the body, the risks of this specialized surgical procedure outweigh the benefits.
  • Don’t use oral antibiotics for treatment of atopic dermatitis unless there is clinical evidence of infection. Antibiotic therapy has not been shown to reduce the signs, symptoms or severity of atopic dermatitis that is not infected.
  • Don’t routinely use topical antibiotics on a surgical wound. The use of topical antibiotics on a clean surgical wound has not been shown to reduce the rate of infection compared to the use of nonantibiotic ointment or no ointment. This recommendation does not apply to wounds received outside a surgical office, such as scraped knees or household accidents resulting in a cut or abrasion.

Mark Lebwohl, MD, FAAD, president of the Academy, added that these recommendations can assist both clinicians and patients in making informed healthcare decisions and select the proper treatments based on a case-by-case basis.

For more information visit AAD.org.


Continue Reading