HealthDay News — For patients with hip osteoarthritis and at least moderate pain, an ultrasound-guided intra-articular hip injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic, administered with advice and education, is effective versus advice and education alone, according to a study published online April 6 in The BMJ.

Zoe Paskins, PhD, from Keele University in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a pragmatic three-arm, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial involving 199 adults aged 40 years and older with hip osteoarthritis and at least moderate pain. Participants were randomly assigned to receive advice and education (best current treatment [BCT]), BCT plus ultrasound-guided injection of triamcinolone and lidocaine, and BCT plus ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine (67, 66, and 66 patients, respectively).

The researchers found that compared with BCT, there was greater mean improvement in hip pain intensity over six months with BCT plus ultrasound-triamcinolone-lidocaine (mean difference, −1.43; standardized mean difference, −0.55). There was no difference reported in hip pain intensity over six months between BCT plus ultrasound-triamcinolone-lidocaine versus BCT plus ultrasound-lidocaine. There was a significant interaction effect observed for the presence of synovitis or effusion on ultrasound where the between-arm difference between injection groups favored BCT plus ultrasound-triamcinolone-lidocaine when synovitis or effusion was present.

“Our patient advisory group felt that these findings offer an important choice to patients, particularly those who are unsuitable for surgery and might feel their treatment options are limited,” the authors write.

One author disclosed receiving funding from Bristol Myers Squibb.

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