The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued updated mask guidance for individuals who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Individuals are considered fully vaccinated at least 2 weeks after they have received the second dose of a 2-dose series of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, or at least 2 weeks after receiving a single-dose of the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine.  

Fully vaccinated individuals may resume indoor and outdoor activities without wearing masks or physical distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules and regulations, including health care settings, local business and workplace guidance. Fully vaccinated individuals will still be required to wear masks when using public transportation (eg, airplanes, buses, trains). 

According to the CDC, fully vaccinated individuals can go unmasked when:


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  • Attending a crowded, outdoor event (eg, live performance, parade, or sporting event).
  • Visiting a barber or hair salon.
  • Going to an uncrowded, indoor shopping center or museum.
  • Going to an indoor movie theater, a full-capacity worship service, or an indoor, high-intensity exercise class.
  • Singing in an indoor chorus.

“Anyone who is fully vaccinated can participate in indoor and outdoor activities, large or small, without wearing a mask or physical distancing,” said Dr Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director. “If you are fully vaccinated, you can start doing the things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. We have all longed for this moment, when we can get back to some sense of normalcy.” 

Additionally, fully vaccinated individuals can refrain from testing following a known exposure unless they are residents or employees of a correctional or detention facility or a homeless shelter.

Reference

Interim public health recommendations for fully vaccinated people. The U.S.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated-guidance.html. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed May 13, 2021.