HealthDay News — Electronic cigarette users have higher risk for earlier stroke onset compared with dual and traditional cigarette users, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2021, held virtually from November 13 to 15.

Neel Patel, MD, MBBS, from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional survey using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database from 2015 to 2018 to examine the effects of smoking habits on individuals with a history of stroke. Data were included for 266,058 respondents, including 79,825 smokers (e-cigarette, 9.72%; traditional, 60.91%, and dual smokers, 29.37%).

The researchers found that the overall prevalence of stroke was 5.41% among all smokers. The prevalence of e-cigarette use was higher than traditional smoking among women with stroke (36.36 vs 33.91%). Compared to traditional smoking, the prevalence of e-cigarette use was higher among Mexican Americans (21.21 vs 6.02%) and other Hispanics (24.24 vs 7.70%). Compared with dual and traditional smokers, e-cigarette users had earlier stroke onset (median age in years: 48 vs 50 and 59, respectively). The prevalence of stroke was higher among traditional smokers versus e-cigarette or dual smokers (6.75 vs1.09 and 3.72%, respectively). The odds of having a history of stroke were higher among e-cigarette users versus traditional smokers in multivariable logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.15).

“These findings have clear implications for physicians, health care policymakers and tobacco product regulatory authorities who are advocating for new regulations on e-cigarette access, sales, and marketing,” Patel said in a statement.


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