A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that nearly 10% of the U.S. population suffers from diabetes, 86 million adults have prediabetes, and 1 in 4 cases of diabetes are currently undiagnosed. The data was published in the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

Key findings from the report include:

  • 29 million people in the United States (9.3% of the population) have diabetes.
  • 1.7 million people aged ≥20 years were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2012.
  • 8.1 million people with diabetes are undiagnosed.
  • Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults.
  • 208,000 people <20 years have been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
  • 86 million adults aged ≥20 years have prediabetes. Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15–30% of these individuals will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.
  • The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35%), non-Hispanic blacks (39%), and Hispanics (38%).
  • Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2010 but may be underreported.

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In the treatment of diabetes, 2.9 million adults currently use insulin-only therapy (14%) vs. 3.1 million who use both insulin and oral medication (14.7%). The majority of adults with diabetes use oral medication only (11.9 million, 56.9%) and 3 million (14.4%) take no medication for diabetes whatsoever.

Based on these statistics, the CDC is urging swift action to treat and prevent prediabetes and diabetes in all populations.

For more information call (800) 232-4636 or visit CDC.gov.

Image source: CDC.gov.