This article is part of MPR’s coverage of the CHEST Virtual 2020 meeting.


The MuLBSTA score accurately predicted outcomes of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia, according to research presented at the 2020 CHEST Annual Meeting held virtually, October 18 to 21.

The MuLBSTA score was recently developed by researchers in Shanghai, China, to predict 90-day mortality in patients with viral pneumonia. Medical records from patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia were retrospectively analyzed. Select risk factors were used to calculate the MuLBSTA score. Risk factors included multilobe infiltrate, absolute lymphocyte count less than or equal to 0.8 x109/L, bacterial coinfection, smoking history, history of hypertension, and being older than 60 years. Predictions from the calculated scores were then compared to actual patient outcomes.

Of the 163 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia included in the study, there was an overall mortality rate of 29.4%, an intensive care unit (ICU) mortality rate of 50.9%, and ventilator-associated mortality of 62.8%. There was a significant positive correlation of the MuLBSTA score with mortality, with a mean MuLBSTA score of 8.67 for patients who survived and 13.6 for patients who died. Furthermore, positive correlations were found with ventilator support (P =.0001) and length of stay (P =.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for MuLBSTA predicting in-hospital mortality at the time of admission was 0.813.


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“This score correlated significantly with mortality, ventilator support, and length of stay, which may be used to provide guidance to screen patients and make further clinical decisions,” the study authors wrote. “Further studies are required to validate this study in larger patient cohorts.”

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Reference

Tusha J, Khanam V, Tegeltija V, Kumar S. The MuLBSTA score: predicting risk of mortality and disease severity in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Presented at: the CHEST Virtual Annual Meeting; October 18-21, 2020. Abstract 300.

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor