APS 2010 Acute Pain

APS 2010 Acute Pain

Low Back Pain: Evaluation, Management, and Prognosis

Low back pain is one of the top 10 most common reasons for doctor office visits in the United States; approximately 80% of adults seek care at some time for acute low back pain. The differential diagnosis for low back pain and the importance of identifying clinical red and yellow flags during evaluation was presented at the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society.

Intranasal Ketorolac Provides Nonopioid Option for Acute Moderate-to-Severe Pain

Intranasal ketorolac provides an efficacious option for management of acute moderate-to-severe pain, results of phase 2/3 placebo-controlled trials have found. These results, which were presented at the American Pain Society’s 29th Annual Scientific Meeting, may be particularly useful for ambulatory patients, when opioid use should be avoided or reduced, Lincoln Bynum, MD, and colleagues of ICON Development Solutions, Redwood City, Calif., reported.

Enteric-Coated Aspirin Plus Immediate-Release Omeprazole—Reduces Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers

The novel therapeutic agent PA65020 (enteric-coated aspirin plus immediate-release omeprazole) significantly reduced gastrointestinal mucosal damage after 28 days of treatment compared with enteric-coated aspirin (EC-ASA) alone. Results of this single-center, phase I, randomized, double-blind study suggest that for at-risk patients requiring analgesic doses of aspirin, PA65020 may be an important option according to a study presented at the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society.

Children with Limb Trauma Remain Suboptimally Treated for Pain in Emergency Departments

Despite receiving ibuprofen and codeine, children presenting to an emergency department (ED) with limb trauma had moderately high pain scores after 120 minutes. These results suggest that to reach a clinically significant decrease in pain, an NSAID should be combined with an opioid stronger than codeine, researchers reported at the American Pain Society’s 29th Annual Scientific Meeting.

Elderly Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Low Back or Osteoarthritis Pain Tolerate Tapentadol Immediate Release (IR) Better than Oxycodone IR

Lower incidences and rates of discontinuation due to gastrointestinal treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) among elderly patients with moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain suggest that tapentadol immediate-release (IR) may be a better treatment option than oxycodone IR, according to a study presented during the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society.

For Acute, Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions, Cyclobenzaprine Enables More Rapid Return to Function than Placebo

Patients with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions can be returned to normal activities rapidly if the spasm-pain-spasm cycle is interrupted promptly. Therefore, time to response following medication administration is a clinically meaningful assessment in this patient population, investigators reported during the American Pain Society’s 29th Annual Scientific Meeting.

Patients Can Taper EMBEDA® with Minimal Risk of Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome

A structured plan for tapering opioid therapy results in minimal risk of opioid withdrawal syndrome, concluded a study of patients with chronic, moderate-to-severe pain from osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. These results provide much-needed objective data regarding withdrawal symptoms from opioid treatment, researchers reported at the 29th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society.