This article is part of MPR’s coverage of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting, being held virtually from November 13-15, 2020.


Women with chronic cough in the United States and United Kingdom were more likely to have a higher number of cough triggers, according to the results of a recent study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting.

Chronic cough triggers were evaluated via survey in individuals based in the United States and United Kingdom who self-reported chronic cough in the 2018 National Health and Wellness Survey. Questions included 7 possible cough triggers. Chronic cough was defined as coughing daily for at least 8 weeks. Respondents who smoked or vaped in the past year, as well as those taking glucocorticoids or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, were excluded.

Of the 408 chronic cough respondents, 296 were based in the United States and 112 in the United Kingdom. There were more women overall: 73% of the US group and 65% of the UK group. In both countries, women were younger than men and reported more cough triggers (US mean, 3.4 vs 2.4; P <.01; UK mean, 3.4 vs 2.4; P <.01).


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Exercise, laughing, talking, and cold air were reported as triggers in US women,  significantly more often than in US men (exercise: 48% vs 31%; laughing: 46% vs 27%; talking: 51% vs 36%; and cold air/temperature change: 62% vs 42%; respectively). However, these differences were not seen the UK population, with the exception of laughing (44% women vs 18% men; P =.001).

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“[Women] with [chronic cough] reported more triggers than [men] among both the US and UK respondents,” the study authors concluded. “These findings are consistent with the clinical manifestation of cough hypersensitivity syndrome.”

Visit MPR‘s conference section for continuous coverage from ACAAI 2020.


Reference

Bernstein J, Morice A, Fonseca E, et al. Cough triggers by gender: a population survey of US and UK adults with chronic cough. Presented at: the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting (Virtual Experience); November 13-15, 2020. Abstract P501.

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor