Statin use is associated with a decreased rate of uncontrolled disease and revision surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who had endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS), according to study results presented at the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) 2022 Annual Meeting and OTO Experience, held from September 10-14, 2022 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Researchers assessed the effects of statins on postoperative outcomes and recurrence in patients with CRS who underwent ESS from 2017 to 2021.

A total of 380 patients (82 patients were taking statins and 298 patients were not taking statins) who completed follow-up for more than 3 months were enrolled. The researchers compared subjective symptoms, postoperative endoscopic scores, and olfactory function outcomes between the statin treatment group and the statin-free group. Multivariate analysis was conducted to assess the effect of statins on postoperative outcomes as determined by the necessity of revision surgery.

Compared with patients with CRS who were not taking statins, those who were taking statins had a statistically significant decrease in the rate of uncontrolled disease (43.6% vs 34.5%, respectively; P =.032).

Statin use was significantly associated with a reduction in the rate of revision surgery (odds ratio, 0.412; P <.05; 95% CI, 0.179-0.951) according to multivariate analysis. At 12 months post-surgery, the discharge score of the Lund-Kennedy scoring system indicated significant improvement in patients receiving statins vs those not taking statins (P <.05).

“Statin medication showed significant beneficial effects in improving postoperative outcomes after ESS,” the researchers stated.

Reference

Min J-Y, Min HK. The effect of statin medication on postoperative outcomes in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Abstract presented at: AAO-HNSF 2022 Annual Meeting and OTO Experience; September 10-14, 2022; Philadelphia, PA.

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor