Some have compared the 3D printing of medications to a high-tech version of pharmaceutical compounding in which the formulation is tailored based on patient needs; with Spritam, it is for a rapid-release drug but others could be created for an extended-release formula. In a 2012 TED Talk, Lee Cronin predicted that one day we would be able to print drugs at the point of need7 – at this point that is still far off into the future, but 3D printing advances are bringing these predictions close to reality.

References

  1. Ventola CL. Medical applications for 3D printing: current and projected uses. Pharmacy and Therapeutics 2014; 39(10): 704-11.
  2. Klein GT, Lu Y, Wang MY, et al, 3D printing and neurosurgery: ready for prime time? World Neurosurgery 2013; 80(3–4): 233-235.
  3. First 3D-printed vertebra successfully implanted. eMPR.com. http://www.empr.com/medical-news/first-3d-printed-vertebra-successfully-implanted/article/367959/. August 25, 2014. Accessed August 25, 2015.

  4. For the first time in dental history, DENTCA, Inc. receives FDA clearance for the first 3D printable denture base material. PRWeb.com. http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/08/prweb12893381.htm. August 8, 2015. Accessed August 25, 2015.
  5. Han, DH. FDA approved first 3D printed tablets. eMPR.com. http://www.empr.com/news/spritam-first-3d-printed-tablets/article/430277/. August 3, 2015. Accessed August 25, 2015.
  6. FDA approved the first 3D printed drug. Aprecia.com. https://www.aprecia.com/pdf/2015_08_03_Spritam_FDA_Approval_Press_Release.pdf. August 3, 2015. Accessed August 25, 2015.
  7. Cronin, L. Print your own medicine. TEDGlobal 2012. http://www.ted.com/talks/lee_cronin_print_your_own_medicine. June 2012. Accessed August 25, 2015.