Why Are Doctors Less Likely to Adjust Depressed Patients' Blood Pressure Rx?

the MPR take:

Research published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that for patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure and depression, doctors may be less likely to make medication changes. Nathalie Moise, MD, and colleagues from Columbia University Medical Center analyzed medical records from 158 individuals who had uncontrolled high blood pressure; approximately 45% of these patients had also been diagnosed with depression. Those with uncontrolled blood pressure and depression had a 49% greater risk of clinical inertia than the patients without depression. The authors warn against under-treating high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disorders among patients with depression.

Why Are Doctors Less Likely to Adjust Depressed Patients' Blood Pressure Rx?
Why Are Doctors Less Likely to Adjust Depressed Patients' Blood Pressure Rx?
So-called clinical inertia is when doctors don't intensify treatment - upping the dose of current drugs or adding new drugs, for instance - for patients who are not at their goals, in this case for ideal blood pressure. "Physicians and patients alike may not be aware that depression places you ...

READ FULL ARTICLE From Reuters