Vaprisol Inj Effectively Increases Serum Sodium in Multicenter Study

Vaprisol was first approved by the FDA in 2005 for euvolemic hyponatremia
Vaprisol was first approved by the FDA in 2005 for euvolemic hyponatremia

Cumberland announced the publication of data from a multicenter, open-label study that further supports the use of Vaprisol (conivaptan) Injection. Findings from the study are published in the journal Drug Design, Development and Therapy

The study (n=251) evaluated conivaptan 20mg/day and 40mg/day for patients with hyponatremia at 28 centers across the world. Study data showed both doses of conivaptan were effective in raising the patients' sodium concentrations over 4 days of treatment. Study patients reached a clinically significant increase in their sodium levels by 24 hours after starting conivaptan therapy. Those who received the higher dose experienced a faster rate of increase, absolute increase, and longer duration of effect. No increase in adverse events were observed with the higher dose.


Vaprisol is an intravenous dual arginine vasopressin (V1A and V2) receptors antagonist indicated for euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia in hospitalized patients. Vaprisol works by raising serum sodium levels and promoting free water secretion. 

It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2005 for euvolemic hyponatremia and in 2007 for hypervolemic hyponatremia. Vaprisol is available as a single-use, premixed 20mg/100mL solution with 1 container per carton.

For more information call (887) 484-2700 or visit Vaprisol.com.

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