Study: Immune Cells Melt Away Tumors in Patient

the MPR take:

A case study published in the journal Science describes a woman whose advanced-state cholangiocarcinoma (bile-duct cancer) tumors shrank after receiving an experimental immune cell therapy. While similar techniques have been successful for patients with leukemia and melanoma, this is the first time that immune cell therapy has been used for solid tumors. Known as adoptive cell therapy, researchers at the National Cancer Institute identified cells from the patient's immune system that attacked a particular gene mutation in the cancerous cells. These cells were grown in a laboratory and infused into her bloodstream. Although the patient is not cured, it could be a promising treatment for other tumors of the digestive tract, ovaries, pancreas, lungs and breasts, which comprise 80% of the 580,000 cancer-related deaths per year.

Study: Immune Cells Melt Away Tumors in Patient
Study: Immune Cells Melt Away Tumors in Patient

An article published Thursday in the journal Science describes the treatment of a 43-year-old woman with an advanced and deadly type of cancer that had spread from her bile duct to her liver and lungs, despite chemotherapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute sequenced the genome of her ...

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