Men and Women Appear to Respond Differently to Statins

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Men and Women Appear to Respond Differently to Statins
Men and Women Appear to Respond Differently to Statins

(HealthDay News) – Statin therapy appears to reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events in both men and women, but it may not reduce the risk of stroke or all-cause mortality in women, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Jose Gutierrez, MD, MPH, from Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues identified randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials evaluating statins for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

In 11 trials involving 43,193 patients the researchers found that statin therapy was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular events in all outcomes for women (relative risk [RR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.74–0.89) and men (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.78–0.85). However, statins did not reduce all-cause mortality in women compared to men (RR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.76–1.13] vs. 0.79 [95% CI, 0.72–0.87]), nor did they reduce stroke in women compared to men (RR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.76–1.1] versus 0.81 [95% CI, 0.72–0.92]).

"Statin therapy is an effective intervention in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in both sexes, but there is no benefit on stroke and all-cause mortality in women," the authors write.

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