Does Naltrexone Work for Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

the MPR take:

A new study published in the journal Neurology looks at the use of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, as a possible treatment for impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The study involved 50 PD patients who were randomized to receive either naltrexone 50–100mg/day or placebo. The difference in Clinical Global Impression-Change response rate between the naltrexone and placebo groups was not considered significant, however naltrexone treatment led to a significantly greater decrease in the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease-Rating Scale score compared with placebo. Researchers conclude that naltrexone, while not efficacious for treating ICD in PD patients using global assessment of response, should still be evaluated further based on response seen on the PD-specific ICD rating scale.  

Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: A placebo-controlled study
Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: A placebo-controlled study
Objective: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) are common and can be difficult to manage. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, for the treatment of ICDs in PD. Methods: Patients with PD (n = 50) and an ICD were enrolled in an 8-week, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of naltrexone 50-100 mg/d (flexible dosing).

READ FULL ARTICLE From www.neurology.org

Loading links....