Diabetic Kidney Disease Risk Factors ID'd in New Study

Findings in large cohort of patients with diabetes over four years of follow-up
Findings in large cohort of patients with diabetes over four years of follow-up

HealthDay News — For patients with diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and high triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with increased risk of diabetic kidney disease (defined as low estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], an eGFR reduction >30%, and/or albuminuria), according to a study published online October 4 in Diabetes Care.

Giuseppina T. Russo, MD, PhD, from the University of Messina in Italy, and colleagues conducted an observational retrospective study involving 15,362 patients attending Italian diabetes centers with baseline eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m², normoalbuminuria, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≤130 mg/dL completing a four-year follow-up.

The researchers found that TG ≥150 mg/dL correlated with increases in the risk of low eGFR (26%), eGFR reduction >30% (29%), albuminuria (19%), and developing one abnormality (35%). HDL-C <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women correlated with increases in the risk of low eGFR (27%), eGFR reduction >30% (28%), albuminuria (24%), and developing one abnormality (44%). The correlations persisted when TG and HDL-C were assessed as continuous variables, and were attenuated by adjustment for multiple confounding variables.

"In a large population of outpatients with diabetes, low HDL-C and high TG levels were independent risk factors for the development of diabetic kidney disease over four years," the authors write.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Loading links....