CDC: Hospital-Associated VTE is a Major Problem

the MPR take:

A grand rounds report published in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examined initiatives to prevent hospital-associated venous thromboembolism (HA-VTE) within these medical settings. Because of the significant number of individuals affected by VTE each year (350,000–900,000), the authors define this as a public health problem and a preventable patient safety problem. Prevention of VTE can be complicated because physicians must balance the risk for thrombosis with the risk for bleeding from anticoagulants by considering each patient's risk for VTE and bleeding relative to the risks and benefits of prophylaxis. Both pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis can be used to prevent VTE. Pharmacologic approaches, such as unfractionated and low molecular weight heparin and other anticoagulants, reduce the potential of blood to clot. Mechanical approaches such as intermittent pneumatic compression devices and graduated compression stockings can reduce blood clot formation by increasing blood flow.

CDC: Hospital-Associated VTE is a Major Problem
CDC: Hospital-Associated VTE is a Major Problem
The disease process that includes DVT and/or pulmonary embolism is called venous thromboembolism (VTE). Hospitalization is an important risk factor in the latter two mechanisms; injury and surgery are causes of vascular injury, and prolonged bed rest can cause stasis. Approximately half of new ...

READ FULL ARTICLE From www.cdc.gov

Loading links....