Do SGLT2 Inhibitors Raise the Risk of Lower Extremity Amputation?

Overall, the authors did not find evidence indicating an increased risk
Overall, the authors did not find evidence indicating an increased risk

Findings from a study published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism reported no increased risk of below-knee lower extremity (BKLE) amputation for patients newly initiated on canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, vs. non-SGLT2 inhibitor antihyperglycemics in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 

Using the Truven MarketScan database, researchers identified patients with type 2 diabetes that were newly started on SGLT2 inhibitors or non-SGLT2 inhibitor antihyperglycemic therapy. They examined the incidence of BKLE amputation for patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors including canagliflozin and non-SGLT2 inhibitors. 

Related Articles

A total of 118,018 patients newly exposed to SGLT2 inhibitors (of which 73,024 were exposed to canagliflozin) and 226,623 patients newly exposed to non-SGLT2 inhibitors were included in the analysis. The incidence rate of BKLE amputation was 1.22 events per 1,000 person-years with SGLT2 inhibitors, 1.26 events per 1,000 person-years with canagliflozin, and 1.87 events per 1,000 person-years with non-SGLT2 inhibitors

In the comparative analysis that matched 63,845 new canagliflozin users with new non-SGLT2 inhibitor users, the incidence rate of BKLE amputation was 1.18 events per 1,000 person-years with canagliflozin vs. 1.12 events per 1,000 person-years with non-SGLT2 inhibitors (hazard ratio 0.98, 95% CI: 0.68–1.41; P=0.92).

Overall, the authors did not find evidence indicating an increased risk of BKLE amputation among new users of canagliflozin vs. non-SGLT2 inhibitors in a general population of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

For more information visit onlinelibrary.wiley.com.