Aspirin Immediately After TIA May Cut Major Stroke Risk

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Researchers find risk is reduced by as much as 80%
Researchers find risk is reduced by as much as 80%

HealthDay News — Taking aspirin immediately after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) significantly reduces the risk of a major stroke, according to research published online May 18 in The Lancet.

Peter Rothwell, a professor and stroke expert at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues studied data from 12 trials (15,778 patients) of aspirin for long-term secondary prevention and 40,000 patients from 3 trials of aspirin in treatment of acute stroke.

The researchers found that taking aspirin after a TIA reduced the risk of a disabling or fatal stroke over the next few days and weeks by 70 to 80%.

"Our findings confirm the effectiveness of urgent treatment after TIA and minor stroke, and show that aspirin is the most important component," Rothwell said in a news release from the University of Oxford. "Immediate treatment with aspirin can substantially reduce the risk and severity of early recurrent stroke."

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