Long-Term Effectiveness of Adalimumab Examined in RA

Over 10 years of data regarding the persistency of adalimumab as well as reasons for discontinuation were evaluated
Over 10 years of data regarding the persistency of adalimumab as well as reasons for discontinuation were evaluated

According to results of an observational analysis, the efficacy of adalimumab is sustained in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who continued therapy for 10 years.

Biologic-naïve RA patients who had enrolled in the Corrona RA registry after initiating adalimumab during follow-up were included in the study. Over 10 years of data regarding the persistency of adalimumab as well as the reasons for medication discontinuation were evaluated. The study authors stated, “Among patients who persisted on adalimumab over the years, clinical [e.g., clinical disease activity index scores (CDAI), physician global assessment, tender joint count, and swollen joint count] and patient-reported outcomes (PRO), such as physical function, pain, fatigue, and morning stiffness, were examined.”

Data analysis found that “Of 1791 biologic-naïve patients treated with adalimumab who had ≥1 follow-up registry visit, 64.1% were still on therapy at 1 year and 10.2% were still on therapy by the end of year 12.” The authors reported that of the patients who continued taking adalimumab for ≥1 year, 67.0% were considered in low disease activity (LDA)/remission (CDAI ≤10). Additionally, all clinical assessments and PROs were improved from baseline.

The study authors also reported that the initial improvements seen in LDA/remission, clinical assessments, and PROs were found to be maintained in patients who continued taking adalimumab over 10 years. They added, “Among patients who discontinued adalimumab, 61.6% were not in LDA/remission and 41.9% switched to another biologic within 12 months after discontinuing adalimumab.”

“Real-world data demonstrate a sustained effectiveness of adalimumab in the treatment of RA for patients who remained on therapy for 10 years,” concluded the study.

For more information visit Springer.com.