Mortality Up for PCI After Cardiac Arrest

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Mortality Up for PCI After Cardiac Arrest
Mortality Up for PCI After Cardiac Arrest

(HealthDay News) — Patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after cardiac arrest are more likely to have more complex lesions, cardiogenic shock, and higher mortality, according to research published in the April 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Navdeep Gupta, MBBS, of the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and colleagues analyzed data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry for 594,734 patients to assess characteristics and outcomes in patients undergoing PCI following cardiac arrest versus without cardiac arrest.

The researchers found that patients undergoing PCI following cardiac arrest were significantly more likely to have complex lesions on angiography than those without cardiac arrest. Patients undergoing PCI following cardiac arrest were significantly more likely to have cardiogenic shock than those without cardiac arrest; this was true for both patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (51 vs. 7.2%) and patients without STEMI (38 vs. 0.8%). Among patients undergoing PCI following cardiac arrest, compared with those without cardiac arrest, in-hospital mortality was substantially higher for those with STEMI (24.9 vs. 3.1%) and those without STEMI (18.7 vs. 0.4%).

"In conclusion, patients who underwent PCI after cardiac arrest had more complex anatomy, more shock, and higher mortality," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

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