VTE Risk Up with Low Gestational Age, Through Young Adulthood

the MPR take:

Although an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in infancy has been linked to preterm birth in previous studies, the risk through young adulthood has not been fully explored. In a new study in the journal Pediatrics, a Swedish national cohort of 3,571,574 individuals, including 206,844 individuals born preterm (gestational age <37 weeks), who were born between 1973–2008 were followed-up through 2010 regarding confirmed VTE diagnosis. Low gestational weight at birth was associated with a greater risk of VTE in infancy, early childhood (ages 1–5) and young adulthood (ages 18–38 years), but not late childhood (ages 6–12 years). Individuals born very preterm (<34 weeks) also had a greater VTE risk in adolescence (13–17 years). Particularly for those born very preterm, the increased risk of VTE should be considered by treating pediatricians and specialists, if applicable.

VTE Risk Up with Low Gestational Age, Through Young Adulthood
VTE Risk Up with Low Gestational Age, Through Young Adulthood

BACKGROUND: Preterm birth has been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in infancy, but the longer-term risk is unknown. Our aim was to examine this association from birth through young adulthood.METHODS: National cohort study of 3 571 574 individuals who were live-born in Sweden from 1973 through 2008, including 206 844 born preterm (gestational age <37 weeks), and followed up to 2010 (ages 0-38 years).

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