Vitamin D and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

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Vitamin D Deficiency May Up Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer
Vitamin D Deficiency May Up Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

(HealthDay News) — Vitamin D levels appear to be associated with first prostate biopsy outcomes, according to research published in the May 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

Adam B. Murphy, MD, of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues analyzed data from 667 men, aged 40–79 years, to assess the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and outcomes of first prostate biopsy.

The researchers found that, among European-American men, 25(OH)D <12ng/mL was associated with Gleason score ≥4+4 (odds ratio [OR], 3.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–9.50; P=0.008) and more advanced tumor stage (stage ≥cT2b vs. ≤cT2a; OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.14–5.10; P=0.008). Among African-American men, 25(OH)D <20ng/mL was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer diagnosis on biopsy (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.20–4.94; P=0.01). Also, among African-American men, 25(OH)D <12ng/mL was associated with Gleason score ≥4+4 (OR, 4.89; 95% CI, 1.59–15.07; P=0.006) and more advanced tumor stage (stage ≥cT2b versus ≤cT2a; OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 1.52–11.74; P=0.003).

"In both European-American and African-American men, severe deficiency was positively associated with higher Gleason grade and tumor stage," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the biomedical industry.

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