Sleep Duration and Dementia Mortality Risk Linked

the MPR take:

The length of average daily total sleep in older adults may be associated with dementia risk, reports a new study in the journal Neurology. In a prospective, population-based study of 3,857 individuals without dementia aged ≥65, participants were followed for a median of 12.5 years and assessed on their average daily sleep duration. The death certificates of those who died were also examined for cause of death. Duration of average daily total sleep was separated into three categories: ≤5 hours of sleep (short sleepers). 6–8 hours (reference category), and ≥9 hours (long sleepers). For the deceased individuals with a dementia condition reported on the death certificate, 53.3% were long sleepers, 39.1% slept 6–8 hours, and 7.6% were short sleepers. The self-reported long sleepers had a 58% increased risk of dementia-specific mortality, even without a diagnosis of dementia at the start of the study. The authors add that the mechanisms underlying this association remain unknown, although they speculate that longer sleep could be an early indication of dementia or linked to an unrecognized confounder like sleep-disordered breathing.

Treating Sleep Disorders in the Geriatric Population
Sleep Duration and Dementia Mortality Risk Linked

Objective: To determine in a population-based study whether long sleep duration was associated with increased risk of dementia mortality.Methods: In this prospective, population-based study of 3,857 people without dementia aged 65 years and older (NEDICES [Neurological Disorders in Central ...

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