Sensor-Augmented Pump Reduces Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pump Cuts Hypoglycemia in T1DM
Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pump Cuts Hypoglycemia in T1DM

(HealthDay News) – For patients with type 1 diabetes, a sensor-augmented pump with insulin suspension reduces the rate of moderate and severe hypoglycemic events compared with a standard insulin pump, according to a study published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Trang T. Ly, MBBS, from the Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth, Australia, and colleagues conducted a trial involving 95 patients with type 1 diabetes who were randomized to a standard insulin pump (49 participants) or sensor-augmented pump with automated insulin suspension (46 patients) for six months. The combined incidence of severe and moderate hypoglycemia was measured as the primary outcome.

The researchers found that the baseline rate of severe and moderate hypoglycemic events was 20.7 per 100 patient-months in the pump-only group and 129.6 events per 100 patients-months in the low-glucose suspension group. The event rates decreased after six months of treatment, from 28 to 16 in the pump-only group and from 175 to 35 in the low-glucose suspension group. Per 100 patient-months, the adjusted incidence rate was 34.2 for the pump-only group and 9.5 for the suspension group, with an incidence rate ratio of 3.6. The mean glycated hemoglobin was unchanged in both groups.

"Sensor-augmented pump therapy with automated insulin suspension reduced the combined rate of severe and moderate hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

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