Self-Reported Penicillin Allergies May Actually Be Chronic Urticaria

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Penicillin allergy or other self-reported allergies should be tested, researchers say
Penicillin allergy or other self-reported allergies should be tested, researchers say

HealthDay News — Patients who self-report penicillin allergy might actually have chronic urticaria, according to a study published online January 9 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Susanna Silverman, MD, from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of 11 143 patients to assess the relationship between self-reported penicillin allergy and chronic urticaria.

The researchers found that the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria was approximately three times greater than in the general population, and the prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was also approximately three times greater than in the population.

"This link between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy highlights the need for clinicians to inquire about self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and to consider penicillin skin testing," the authors write. "Furthermore, patients who report penicillin allergy might actually have chronic urticaria, indicating the importance of inquiring about chronic urticaria symptoms in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy."

Abstract
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