Robotic Hysterectomy Usage Up for Benign Disease

Robotic Hysterectomy Usage Up for Benign Disease
Robotic Hysterectomy Usage Up for Benign Disease

(HealthDay News) – The use of robotic hysterectomy procedures has significantly increased, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Eric B. Rosero, MD, from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues utilized the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify matched cohorts of women undergoing robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease.

The researchers found that there were 804,551 hysterectomies performed for benign conditions, of which 20.6% were laparoscopic and 5.1% were robotically assisted. The use of robotic hysterectomy for minimally invasive procedures increased significantly, from 9.5% to 13.6% from 2009–2010. The overall complication rates were similar between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy (8.8% vs. 8.85%; relative risk, 0.99; P=0.91); however, the incidence of blood transfusions was significantly lower in robotic cases (2.1% vs. 3.1%; P<0.001), while patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy were more likely to experience postoperative pneumonia (relative risk, 2.2; P=0.005). Robotic hysterectomy patients had significantly higher median hospital care costs (an average of $2,489 higher) compared to those undergoing laparoscopic procedures.

"Perioperative outcomes are similar between laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy, but robotic cases cost substantially more," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
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