Research Defines Contemporary PCI Outcome Predictors

This article originally appeared here.
Contemporary PCI Outcome Predictors
Contemporary PCI Outcome Predictors

(HealthDay News) — For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), predictors of outcome include previous anemia, previous chronic kidney injury, and previous moderate to severe left ventricular dysfunction, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Uri Landes, MD, from the Rabin Medical Center in Petach-Tikva, Israel, and colleagues defined contemporary PCI outcome predictors in a large patient cohort. Data were included for 11,441 consecutive patients who underwent PCI. Outcome end points were defined as all-cause mortality and a composite of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction during follow-up (mean, 5.5 years).

The researchers found that in addition to known predictors of death or myocardial infarction such as advanced age, female gender, urgent setting, and diabetes mellitus (hazard ratios [HRs], 1.031, 1.23, 1.23, and 1.28; all P<0.001), previous anemia, previous chronic kidney injury, and previous moderate to severe left ventricular dysfunction were identified as predictors in multivariate analysis (HRs, 1.55, 1.93, and 2.29; all P<0.001). There was a correlation between drug-eluting stent placement with better outcomes (HR, 0.70; P<0.001).

"In conclusion, this analysis confirms the effect of some known predictors of PCI outcomes," the authors write. "However, the extent of their effect is modest, while other predictors may have a greater influence on outcomes."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)