Repeat Colonoscopies Have Few Benefits for Some Patients

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Repeat Colonoscopies Have Few Benefits for Some Patients
Repeat Colonoscopies Have Few Benefits for Some Patients

(HealthDay News) — Repeat colonoscopies within 10 years are of little benefit to patients who had no polyps found on adequate examination; however, repeat colonoscopies do benefit patients when the baseline examination was compromised, according to research published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

David A. Lieberman, MD, of the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, and colleagues analyzed data for 17,525 asymptomatic patients who were found to have no polyps during a screening colonoscopy and received another colonoscopy within 10 years.

The researchers found that repeat colonoscopy within one year, typically done because of inadequate bowel preparation or incomplete exam for the baseline colonoscopy, showed a prevalence of large polyps (>9mm) of 6.5 percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3–7.6%). This prevalence is similar to the rate found in the average-risk screening population. Among patients with an adequate baseline examination, the incidence of large polyps upon repeat colonoscopy was 3.1% (95% CI, 2.7–3.5%) within 1–5 years and 3.7% (95% CI, 3.3–4.1%) within 5–10 years.

"In light of the maturing body of evidence about the strong influence of sex, race/ethnicity, and other factors (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, diet) on the risk of neoplasia, individualized risk-based screening and surveillance algorithms should be developed," write the authors of an accompanying editorial.

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