Reducing Body Fat Predicts Exercise-Induced HbA1c Change

Body Fat Reduction Best Predicts Exercise-Induced HbA1c Change
Body Fat Reduction Best Predicts Exercise-Induced HbA1c Change

(HealthDay News) – Reductions in central adiposity and improved fitness are the most prominent predictors of changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) after exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online May 13 in Diabetes Care.

Martin Sénéchal, PhD, from the Manitoba Institute of Child Health in Winnipeg, Canada, and colleagues randomly assigned 201 adults with type 2 diabetes to aerobic, resistance, or combined training for nine months and examined associations between changes in body composition and fitness with changes in HbA1c. Waist circumference, total and trunk fat mass, appendicular fat mass, lean body mass, isokinetic leg muscle strength, peak oxygen uptake, and estimated METs were assessed at baseline and follow-up.

The researchers found significant associations between changes in HbA1c and changes in body weight, waist circumference, trunk fat mass, and estimated metabolic equivalents. Across quartiles of waist circumference, trunk fat mass, and estimated metabolic equivalents, there was a significant trend in change in HbA1c. The likelihood of having reduced HbA1c after training was significantly greater with increased estimated metabolic equivalents and reduced trunk fat mass (odds ratio, 3.48). The likelihood of reduced HbA1c and/or reduced use of type 2 diabetes medications was significantly greater with increased estimated metabolic equivalents and reduced waist circumference (odds ratio, 2.81).

"In patients with type 2 diabetes, a reduction in central adiposity and increase in fitness were the most prominent predictors of the change in HbA1c in response to exercise training," Sénéchal and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
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