Poor Sleep Quality Tied to Suicide Risk in Older Adults

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Poor Sleep Quality Tied to Suicide Risk in Older Adults
Poor Sleep Quality Tied to Suicide Risk in Older Adults

(HealthDay News) — Poor self-reported sleep quality is tied to an increased risk of suicide death within 10 years among older adults, according to a study published online August 13 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD, from Stanford University in California, and colleagues matched 20 older adults committing late-life suicide to 400 community-dwelling controls (based on age, sex, and study site) participating in the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly.

The researchers found that poor sleep quality at baseline was significantly associated with increased risk for suicide (odds ratio [OR], 1.39; P<0.001) at 10 years of follow-up. Two individual sleep items were associated with elevated risk for suicide at 10-year follow-up: difficulty falling asleep (OR, 2.24; P<0.01) and nonrestorative sleep (OR, 2.17; P<0.01). Baseline self-reported sleep quality was associated with increased risk for death by suicide (OR, 1.30; P<0.05), when controlling for depressive symptoms.

"Disturbed sleep appears to confer considerable risk, independent of depressed mood, for the most severe suicidal behaviors and may warrant inclusion in suicide risk assessment frameworks to enhance detection of risk and intervention opportunity in late life," the authors write.

Abstract
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