Poor Kidney Function Tied to Higher Incident Cancer Rates

NKF: Poor Kidney Function Tied to Higher Incident Cancer Rates
NKF: Poor Kidney Function Tied to Higher Incident Cancer Rates

(HealthDay News) — Poor kidney function, measured by a low glomerular filtration rate (GFR), is independently associated with a higher risk of incident cancer, compared to participants with preserved GFR, according to a study presented at the National Kidney Foundation's 2014 Spring Clinical Meetings, held from April 22–26 in Las Vegas.

Dhruti P. Chen, MD, from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and colleagues analyzed data from participants in the Antihypertensive And Lipid-Lowering Treatment To Prevent Heart Attack Trial, excluding those randomized to doxazosin.

The researchers found that, over a median 4.9 years of follow-up, 2,529 of the 31,896 eligible participants had incident cancer. Among patients with estimated GFR (eGFR) of >90, 75–90, and 60–75ml/min/1.73 m², cancer incidence rates per 100 person-years were 7.24, 8.47, and 8.29, respectively. Among patients with eGFR of 45–60 and 30–45ml/min/1.73 m², the incidence rate increased to 9.18 and 11.88, respectively. Participants with eGFR of 30–45ml/min/1.73 m² still had significantly higher risk for cancer (hazard ratio, 1.43), after adjusting for common cancer risk factors, compared to participants with eGFR ≥90ml/min/1.73 m². These findings were similar across age, race, gender, and diabetes subgroups.

"While this study provides a unique and novel perspective on the association of kidney disease and cancer, there is certainly more research needed to look closely at which specific cancers are more prevalent and which patients may be at higher risk," Chen said in a statement.

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