PFCs Linked to Metabolic Changes in Overweight Kids

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PFCs Linked to Metabolic Changes in Overweight Kids
PFCs Linked to Metabolic Changes in Overweight Kids

(HealthDay News) — Exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated chemicals is associated with increased insulin and triglyceride concentrations in overweight children, according to research published online February 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Clara Amalie Gade Timmerman, of the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, and colleagues assessed the relationship between plasma PFC concentrations and adiposity and markers of glycemic control in children. The children were aged 8–10 years and from a subset of participants in the Danish component of the European Youth Heart Study.

The researchers found that, among overweight children, an increase of 10ng/mL perfluorooctane sulfonic acid was associated with higher insulin concentration (16.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2–28.3%), higher β-cell activity (12.0%; 95 percent CI, 2.4–22.4%), higher insulin resistance (17.6%; 95% CI, 5.8–30.8%), and higher triglyceride concentration (8.6%; 95% CI, 1.2–16.5%). Also among overweight children, an increase of 10ng/mL perfluorooctanoic acid was associated with higher insulin concentration (71.6%; 95% CI, 2.4–187.5%), higher β-cell function (67.5%; 95% CI, 5.5–166.0%), higher insulin resistance (73.9%; 95% CI, 0.2–202.0%), and higher triglyceride concentration (76.2%; 95% CI, 22.8–153.0%). No association was found between PFC exposures and either adiposity or markers of glycemic control among normal-weight children.

"Among overweight children, increased PFC concentrations were associated with higher insulin and triglyceride concentrations," the authors write.

Abstract
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