Outbreaks Don't Stimulate Action, Says Vaccine Study

the MPR take:

Outbreaks don't necessarily spark action in parents when it comes to immunization. New study results show that during the pertussis outbreak that occurred in Washington in 2012, there was hardly a difference in the rate of vaccination among the 80,311 children evaluated before and during the outbreak. Only a 2.1% difference was seen in the rate of vaccination before and during the epidemic. Researchers pointed out this difference is not considered statistically significant. Although it is unclear why the vaccination rate did not increase significantly, physicians theorize that parental fears about the vaccine still outweigh any fears of their child actually contracting the disease.

Outbreaks Don't Stimulate Action, Says Vaccine Study
Outbreaks Don't Stimulate Action, Says Vaccine Study

Since 1924, more than 100 million cases of childhood disease in the U.S. have been prevented through vaccination programs. Yet new findings show that when an epidemic is in full swing, and serious illness could be averted, immunization rates do not increase. Researchers compared rates of infant immunization during an outbreak of whooping cough, also called pertussis, ...

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