Nurses Most Motivated to Help More Likely to Burn Out

Nurses Most Motivated to Help More Likely to Burn Out
Nurses Most Motivated to Help More Likely to Burn Out

(HealthDay News) — Nurses who have high levels of prosocial motivation are more likely to report job burnout, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, held from August 16–19 in San Francisco.

Janette Dill, PhD, of the University of Akron in Ohio, and colleagues conducted a survey of 730 nurses (90% white female) to examine the effect of an individual's source of motivation on well-being and employment decisions.

The researchers found that nurses who have high levels of intrinsic (prosocial) motivation and extrinsic motivation (e.g., wages, lifestyle) have better health and employment outcomes, including fewer physical symptoms, less likelihood of reporting intention to leave, and less burnout. Nurses with high levels of prosocial motivation are more likely to report job burnout.

"Our findings suggest that motives that expand beyond prosocial motivation are protective for the health of workers and may benefit organizations and patients as well," the authors write.

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