Novel Technique Measures Surface Area of Internal Nasal Valve

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Endoscopic suction-assisted evaluation can be used for measuring pre-op, post-op compliance
Endoscopic suction-assisted evaluation can be used for measuring pre-op, post-op compliance

HealthDay News — Endoscopic suction-assisted evaluation of the internal nasal valve can measure internal nasal valve area and function, according to a study published online January 14 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

James C. Marotta, MD, from Marotta Facial Plastic Surgery, and Kyeesha Becoats, MD, from Stony Brooke University – both in Smithtown, NY, examined whether intraoperative endoscopic suction-assisted evaluation of the internal nasal valve is useful for assessing internal nasal valve area and function. Twenty patients undergoing cosmetic and functional septorhinoplasty were enrolled; seven underwent follow-up at three years. The internal nasal valve was photographed endoscopically with and without suction preoperatively, postoperatively, and at three-year follow-up.

The researchers found that there was no difference in the observed static surface area of the internal nasal valve on comparison of preoperative and postoperative values (P = 0.58). Comparing preoperative and immediate postoperative values, there was no difference in the observed surface area of the internal nasal valve under negative pressure (P = 0.97). When exposed to negative sniff pressures, the surface area of the internal nasal valve was increased by 45% during the three-year follow-up (P = 0.03). Under negative pressure, the surface area measured a mean of 47,683 square pixels preoperatively and 85,612 square pixels at the three-year follow-up.

"The study outlines a novel technique for measuring internal nasal valve surface area and compliance preoperatively and postoperatively," the authors write.

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