Neonatal Size Associated With Asthma Development

Neonatal Size Associated With Asthma Development
Neonatal Size Associated With Asthma Development

(HealthDay News) – Larger neonates born at term to mothers with a history of asthma are more likely to develop asthma by age 7, but are not more likely to have allergic sensitization or atopic dermatitis.

Astrid Sevelsted, and Hans Bisgaard, MD, of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, conducted a longitudinal, prospective study of 411 term neonates born to mothers with a history of asthma to determine whether these children were more likely to develop asthma by age 7. The possible correlation with atopic dermatitis or allergic sensitization was also investigated.

The researchers found that there was a significant association for neonatal weight, length, body mass index, and head-circumference with asthma at age 7. The estimated birth weight z-score was associated with an adjusted odds ratio for asthma of 1.87 (P = 0.004), and the neonatal weight z-score was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio for onset of asthma of 1.46 (P = 0.013). There was no association between neonatal size and atopic dermatitis or allergic sensitization.

"Neonatal size was found to be an independent risk factor for asthma but not for atopic dermatitis or allergic sensitization in Danish high-risk children," the authors write. "Our findings suggest some common etiology between neonatal size and development of asthma."

Abstract
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