MSG Makes Food Taste Good Enough (Not) to Eat

the MPR take:

Umami has been called the “fifth taste” and described as meaty, savory, and distinctive. As glutamate in ingredients break down during cooking, L-glutamate is formed which creates the umami taste. Most commonly, monosodium glutamate (MSG) is added to foods for the umami sensation and now it may also help people eat less with greater satiety. Study participants were assigned to fixed portions of a soup high in calories, protein, and carbohydrates with added monosodium glutamate and inosine 5′-monophosphate (MSG/IMP), the same soup without MSG/IMP, or a control low-calorie soup. Those who ate the soup with MSG/IMP subsequently ate less in a lunch immediately following the soup but reported greater post-meal satiety. This research points to the fact that a person's appetite may be controlled by the flavors of the food they consume.

MSG Makes Food Taste Good Enough (Not) to Eat
MSG Makes Food Taste Good Enough (Not) to Eat

Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been shown to increase satiety when combined with protein. Objective: We assessed effects of a combination of monosodium glutamate and inosine 5'-monophosphate (MSG/IMP) provided either alone or in a high-energy, high-carbohydrate and -protein soup on appetite during ingestion and postingestive satiety.

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