Most Pediatric Procedural Pain Guidelines of Average Quality

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Most Pediatric Procedural Pain Guidelines of Average Quality
Most Pediatric Procedural Pain Guidelines of Average Quality

(HealthDay News) — Most clinical practice guidelines for procedural pain in children are of average quality and most do not provide tools to help clinicians apply the recommendations in practice settings, according to research published online February 2 in Pediatrics.

Grace Y. Lee, RN, from the University of Toronto, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the quality of existing practice guidelines for acute procedural pain in children. Eighteen guidelines were included in the review. Relevant guidelines were reviewed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II Instrument.

The researchers found that the guidelines generally scored high in the AGREE II domains of scope and purpose and clarity of presentation areas. The guidelines rarely specified information on the rigor of guideline development, applicability, or editorial independence. Tools to help clinicians apply the recommendations in practice settings were provided by four of the 18 guidelines. Five guidelines were recommended for use in clinical settings and 13 were recommended for use with modification.

"Despite the increasing availability of clinical practice guidelines for procedural pain in children, the majority are of average quality," the authors write. "More transparency and comprehensive reporting are needed for the guideline development process."

Abstract
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