Methazolamide: A New Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes?

the MPR take:

Methazolamide is a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, yet the antidiabetic effects of this agent do not appear to be related to its mechanism of action. In a study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the safety and efficacy of methazolamide was evaluated in 76 patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients were given either methazolamide 40mg twice daily or placebo for 24 weeks; placebo-corrected reduction in HbA1c from baseline to 24 weeks was the primary endpoint. Patients in the methazolamide group (co-treated with metformin) saw a reduction in HbA1c of –0.39%, a reduction in alanine aminotransferase (~10 units/L) and weight loss (2%). The proportion of patients achieving HbA1c ≤6.5% increased from 8 to 33% in the methazolamide group. Based on study results, researchers believe that methazolamide can be considered a new intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of methazolamide as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized 76 patients to oral methazolamide (40 mg b.i.d.) or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point for methazolamide treatment was a placebo-corrected reduction in HbA1c from baseline after 24 weeks (ΔHbA1c).

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