Measuring HbA1c at Admission Helps Tailor Treatment Regimen

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Measuring HbA1c at Admission Helps Tailor Treatment Regimen
Measuring HbA1c at Admission Helps Tailor Treatment Regimen

(HealthDay News) — Measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at hospital admission can tailor treatment regimens at discharge, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

Guillermo E. Umpierrez, MD, from Emory University in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a prospective, multicenter open-label study to examine the safety and efficacy of a hospital discharge algorithm based on admission HbA1c. Two hundred, twenty-four patients with HbA1c <7%; 7–9%; and >9% were discharged on their preadmission diabetes therapy; preadmission regimen plus glargine; and oral antidiabetes agents plus glargine or basal bolus regimen, respectively. HbA1c was assessed at 12 weeks after hospital discharge.

The researchers found that HbA1c decreased from 8.7 ± 2.5% at admission to 7.3 ± 1.5 p% at 12 weeks of follow-up (P<0.001). From baseline to 12 weeks, the change of HbA1c was −0.1 ± 0.6 for patients with HbA1c <7%; −0.8 ± 1.0 for patients with HbA1c of 7–9%; and −3.2 ± 2.4 for patients with HbA1c of >9% (P<0.001).

"Measurement of HbA1c on admission is beneficial in tailoring treatment regimens at discharge in general medicine and surgery patients with type 2 diabetes," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Sanofi, which partially funded the study.

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