Looking Into Nearsightedness: Why Rates Have Soared

the MPR take:

1.6 billion people worldwide are suffering from some form of myopia, commonly known as nearsightedness. A 2009 study reported that 41% of participants had myopia, compared to only 25% 30 years earlier; younger adults (20-39 years old) were also more likely to have severe myopia compared to elderly individuals. Increased access to formal education and technology use among children are thought to be connected with the increase. However, there is research now that says time spent outdoors (10-14 hours per week) may help prevent myopia. Currently only one drug, atropine, has been shown to slow the progression of myopia, although lifestyle and behavioral changes can also be effective.

Looking Into Nearsightedness: Why Rates Have Soared
Looking Into Nearsightedness: Why Rates Have Soared

Why did myopia increase by 66 percent between the early 1970's and the early 2000's. A quarter of the world's population, or 1.6 billion people, now suffer from some form of myopia, according to the Myopia Institute. The surveys used the same examination methods for both periods of time to ...

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