Intervention Cuts Catheter-Related Pediatric UTIs

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Intervention Cuts Catheter-Related Pediatric UTIs
Intervention Cuts Catheter-Related Pediatric UTIs

(HealthDay News) — Enactment of a quality improvement prevention bundle at a tertiary care children's hospital significantly reduced the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), according to research published online August 11 in Pediatrics.

Katherine Finn Davis, RN, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study to assess the epidemiology of incident pediatric CAUTIs at a children's hospital during a three-year period. The researchers also examined the impact of a CAUTI quality improvement bundle, which included practice standards for insertion and maintenance of urinary catheters, staff training, daily review of need for a catheter, and rapid review of all CAUTIs.

The researchers observed a 50% reduction in the mean monthly CAUTI rate from 5.41 to 2.49 per 1,000 catheter-days (95% confidence interval, −1.28–−0.12; P=0.02) following implementation of the CAUTI prevention bundle. Most pediatric patients with CAUTIs were female (75%), were admitted to the pediatric or cardiac intensive care unit (70%), and had at least one complex chronic medical condition (98%). Almost 90% of patients who developed a CAUTI had a recognized indication for urinary catheterization.

"CAUTI is a common pediatric health care-associated infection," the authors write. "Implementation of a prevention bundle can significantly reduce CAUTI rates in children."

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