Insulin Resistance Cut-Off Established From Clamp Data

Insulin Resistance Cut-Off Established From Clamp Data
Insulin Resistance Cut-Off Established From Clamp Data

(HealthDay News) – Cut-offs for predicting insulin resistance based on hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data and routinely measured clinical and biochemical variables have been determined.

To determine a cut-off point for insulin resistance in a white population, Charmaine S. Tam, PhD, from the Louisiana State University System in Baton Rouge, and colleagues analyzed data from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (120mU/m² per minute) for 51 individuals with diabetes and 116 individuals without diabetes.

Using the clamp-derived glucose disposal rate (GDR) as a measure of insulin sensitivity, the researchers found that true insulin resistance was present in 75% of individuals with a GDR of <5.6mg/kg fat-free mass (FFM) + 17.7min. Separate cut-offs were also determined after adjusting for body weight, body surface area, or FFM. Values for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, which is determined from routinely measured clinical and biochemical variables of >5.9 or >2.8 but <5.9 with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <51mg/dL, predicted insulin resistance with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 67%.

"We developed a cut-off for defining insulin resistance from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps," Tam and colleagues conclude. "Moreover, we now provide classification trees for predicting insulin resistance from routinely measured clinical and biochemical markers."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)