HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase VTE Risk, Says New Study

the MPR take:

The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine that targets targeting HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 has not been shown to increase the risk of venous thromboembolis (VTE), reports new research in the Journal of the American Medical Association. This study is the largest controlled review of the safety of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to date.  Demographic and healthcare data on all Danish women ages 10–44 from October 1, 2006–July 31, 2013 found no association between quadrivalent HPV vaccination and rates of VTE during the 43 days after vaccination, even taking into account the use of anticoagulants and oral contraceptives, which can influence VTE outcomes, the researchers found no difference in the incidence of VTE between the vaccinated women and the unvaccinated women. Two previous studies had linked an increased risk of VTE following quadrivalent HPV vaccination, but one was based on a passive surveillance system and the other had few VTE cases in those receiving the vaccination. In addition, individuals with VTE also commonly have other known risk factors that can make determining the cause difficult.  

HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase VTE Risk, Says New Study
HPV Vaccine Does Not Increase VTE Risk, Says New Study

A new post-approval study of over 1.6 million Danish women has shown that the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine poses no increased risk of blood clots at any time within 42 days of receiving the immunization. As a result A causal relationship between HPV (type 16) and some cases mouth, tongue, and throat cancers has also been demonstrated in men.

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