Greater Fiber Intake Leads to Lower Risk of Cardiac Events

Greater Fiber Intake Leads to Lower Risk of Cardiac Events
Greater Fiber Intake Leads to Lower Risk of Cardiac Events

(HealthDay News) – Increased dietary intake of fiber is linked with lower risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, with every 7g per day intake of total dietary fiber associated with a 9% lower relative risk, according to research published online Dec. 19 in BMJ.

Diane E. Threapleton, of the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of cohort studies to assess the possible dose-response relationship between dietary fiber intake and heart disease.

The researchers found that total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (risk ratio, 0.91 per 7g/day) and coronary heart disease (risk ratio, 0.91). Intake of insoluble fiber and fiber from cereal and vegetable sources was inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. Intake of fruit fiber was inversely associated with risk of cardiovascular disease.

"Consistent with most other studies, the meta-analysis showed a consistent inverse association between intake of dietary fiber and first coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events," writes the author of an accompanying editorial. "For both outcomes, every 7g per day intake of total dietary fiber was associated with a significant 9% lower relative risk of first events."

One author disclosed receiving funding from the Kellogg Company.

Full Text
Editorial

Loading links....