Global Burden of Stroke Increased From 1990-2010

Global Burden of Stroke Increased From 1990 to 2010
Global Burden of Stroke Increased From 1990 to 2010

(HealthDay News) – From 1990–2010 there was an increase in the global burden of stroke, and of incident ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, according to two studies published online Oct. 24 in The Lancet and The Lancet Global Health.

Valery L. Feigin, MD, from the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, and colleagues applied the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 analytical technique to data from 119 studies to assess the global and regional burden of stroke from 1990–2010. The researchers found that, in high-income countries, the age-standardized incidence of stroke decreased significantly, while in low- and middle-income countries, the rate increased non-significantly. Worldwide, mortality rates decreased significantly. From 1990–2010 there was an increase in the absolute numbers of people with first stroke, stroke survivors, stroke-related deaths, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost.

Rita V. Krishnamurthi, PhD, also from the Auckland University of Technology, and colleagues used data from the 119 studies to examine the global and regional burden of first-ever ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke during 1990–2010. The researchers found that there was an increase in the burden of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke worldwide from 1990–2010, with increases in the absolute number of people with incident ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, number of deaths, and DALYs lost; however, mortality rates decreased.

"Our findings provide a unique global perspective on stroke burden by type, and could be used as a vital source of information for future planning of preventive strategies for stroke worldwide," Krishnamurthi and colleagues write.

Abstract - Feigin
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Abstract - Krishnamurthi
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