For RA Patients, Low CVD Risk with NSAIDs

the MPR take:

Previous research has linked non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the risk could be lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using the Danish nationwide individual-level registry data, researchers compared the risk of NSAID-associated major cardiovascular disease between RA patients and controls.  After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, CVD risk associated with overall NSAID use was significantly lower in RA patients compared to controls  (HR 1.22 (95% CI 1.09–1.37) vs. 1.51 (1.36 to 1.66),  p<0.01). While other NSAIDS reported in the study were not linked to an increase in cardiovascular risk, two drugs, rofecoxib and diclofenac, were associated with increased CVD risk in RA patients. Researchers conclude that treatment with NSAIDs should be individualized and that CVD risk should not preclude the use of these drugs for pain relief.

For RA Patients, Low CVD Risk with NSAIDs
For RA Patients, Low CVD Risk with NSAIDs

Objective: To examine the risk of major cardiovascular disease associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in a large 'real-world' contemporary rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted with use of Danish nationwide individual-level registry data on inpatient and outpatient health care provision, pharmacotherapy and income during 1997-2009.

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