Ecstasy Leads to Rare Spinal Artery Aneurysm

the MPR take:

The first reported case of posterior spinal artery aneurysm linked to recreational drug use has been detailed in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery. A healthy teenage boy took 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as ecstasy) and developed an aneurysm on the left side of his spinal cord artery at the back of the neck. The aneurysm and weakened spinal cord artery were removed and the boy made a full recovery. The condition is extremely rare, with only 12 cases reported; all resulted in bleeding impacting spinal cord functioning. The drug has been previously been linked to stroke, inflammation of the arteries in the brain, and brain bleeding.

Ecstasy Leads to Rare Spinal Cord Aneurysm
Ecstasy Leads to Rare Spinal Cord Aneurysm

A teen who took the street drug called "ecstasy" suffered a potentially deadly bulge in his spinal cord artery, doctors said. This condition -- called a posterior spinal artery aneurysm -- occurs when the artery wall weakens and bulges. In the new case study, published online July 3 in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery, doctors describe the case of a healthy teenage boy who had taken ecstasy.

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